Text 4 Nov ENDER’S GAME
For most of my life my mind has wrestled with the ongoing question: what to do when braun seems to overpower brain?  I have always been small in stature, always the shortest in my class and, therefore, always somewhat limited to what I could physically accomplish.  But don’t we all have mechanical limitations to our abilities?  Don’t we all share some sort of inability based on what makes us who we are?  
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I think so.
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For me, limitations that manifested themselves of a physical nature simply revealed to me “there must be another way.”  Whether it’s something high up on a shelf or something too heavy to lift, it was the act of creative problem solving that became both the source of fuel and satisfaction of success.  Little did I know that this type of arrangement and experience as both a child and an adult was absolutely the best preparation for taking on the life of an entrepreneur in an industry on the brink of change.
Author Malcolm Gladwell’s latest book, “David and Goliath” is the story of the complex relationship between strength and weakness.  Based on this old Bible story, Gladwell is quick to point out giants are not always as strong or powerful as they may seem.  In fact, David wasn’t the lowly sacrificial lamb that the Philistine’s thought was about to commit suicide, rather David knew he was going to win before anything ever happened.  So how could a shepherd boy armed with five stones and a sling walk to an eight-foot warrior and know, without a doubt, that he was going to win?  The answer is simple: David was not going to fight on Goliath’s terms.
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All too often, we find ourselves losing battles because we are fighting them on the terms of our adversaries.  The story of David and Goliath is not one of luck, but one of control.  David knew that the source of Goliath’s greatest strength was simultaneously the source of his biggest weakness:  Size.  And that’s exactly what the information age is proving over and over and over again: The size, age, and design of giants can be overtaken by newer, smaller, and innovative ideas that are not playing by the same rules.
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Recently, the Light Iron team had the pleasure of collaborating with one of the best cinematographers of all time, Don McAlpine, on the film, Ender’s Game.  Like us, Don recognizes Goliath when he sees him and has no intention of falling into a trap.
In Don’s words, “I chose RED because the Hollywood establishment had produced so much anti-propoganda that I knew it must be equal or superior to the more established equipment.  While I will leave the future equipment requirements to younger and more agile minds than mine, I will, however, be very pleased to consider any device that can expend our vision.”  Fittingly, Ender’s Game is a film about strength and weakness and an unlikely character who succeeds by holding strong to a vision that others lack.
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To my friends and colleagues: Whenever I am engaged in situations that I do not control I get confused, I become fearful, and I am prone to make mistakes in a battle I most likely cannot win.  It’s overwhelming.  I know many of you know what that feels like.  But when I take control, make predictions, and adequately prepare based on known weaknesses, I can face the biggest giants with the certainty I will succeed.  In the business of digital cinema, when you arm yourself with workflow and innovation, you move the odds in your favor.  This is the story of how just a few self-driven people armed with workflow and innovation were able to manage one of the biggest films of the year.  And it’s a story that if you “get it,”demonstrates how you can accomplish exactly the same thing.
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